Learn Levantine Arabic with the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method

Learn Levantine Arabic with the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method

Learn & Accelerate Your Levantine Arabic with the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method

Learning a new language can be challenging, but with the right approach, it becomes an exciting and rewarding journey. At our online Levantine Arabic classes, we’ve developed a unique method to accelerate your language learning experience – the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method.

Why Choose the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method?

1. Focus on Conversation:
Our primary goal is to get you speaking Levantine Arabic confidently and fluently. Unlike traditional methods that emphasize reading and writing, our approach is entirely conversation-based. This means you’ll be speaking Arabic from day one, helping you to think in the language and use it naturally.

2. Balanced Structure:
The 20/20 Fast Tracking Method includes 20 group sessions and 20 private sessions. Group sessions provide a dynamic environment where you can practice speaking with peers, while private sessions offer personalized attention to address your specific needs and boost your confidence.

3. Tailored for All Levels:
We offer three levels of classes – Beginner, Intermediate, and Advanced. Whether you’re starting from scratch or looking to polish your skills, our method adapts to your proficiency level, ensuring you get the most out of every session.

How the 20/20 Fast Tracking Method Works

Group Sessions:
– Small Groups: Each group consists of no more than six students, ensuring that everyone gets ample speaking time.
– Twice a Week: Classes meet twice a week, providing regular practice and keeping the momentum going.
– Thematic Lessons: Each week focuses on a specific theme. The instructor explains the lesson for about 15 minutes, followed by interactive exercises, translation practice, role-plays, conversation and open Q&A sessions.

Private Sessions:
– 10-Minute Conversations: In addition to group sessions, you get 20 private 10-minute conversation sessions with your instructor. These one-on-one sessions are crucial for building confidence and fluency.
– Flexible Scheduling: You can choose to have these sessions twice a week for 10 minutes each or once a week for 20 minutes, depending on your schedule and preference.
– Frequent Practice: Short, frequent sessions trick your brain into believing you’re using the language more often, accelerating your learning process.

Addressing Common Student Concerns

When students join our conversation classes, they often express frustration with other courses they’ve taken. They commonly complain that previous classes did not allocate enough time for actual conversation practice. Many feel disappointed after completing those courses, realizing that despite the theoretical knowledge, they lack the ability to speak fluently. Our 20/20 Fast Tracking Method directly addresses this issue by ensuring ample conversation practice both in group settings and one-on-one sessions with instructors.

Success Stories

After six years of running group conversation classes, we realized that many students were not getting enough speaking practice. The 20/20 Fast Tracking Method was born out of this insight. Students who have gone through our program report significant improvements in their speaking abilities. Those who were once shy or uncomfortable speaking in front of others now participate confidently in conversations.

Join Us Today!

Ready to take your Levantine Arabic to the next level? Our 20/20 Fast Tracking Method is designed to help you speak Arabic fluently and confidently in no time. Enroll in our online classes and start your journey towards mastering Levantine Arabic today!

Click here to sign-up for our group conversation classes! We have Two Time Zones available, EST & WET! 

Fruits & Vegetables in Levantine Arabic

Fruits & Vegetables in Levantine Arabic

Notes for video “Picnic”- Make sure to watch the video first at the bottom of the page, and then follow along with the script- Enjoy!

Ah, summer! The season of sunshine, blue skies, and the irresistible allure of the great outdoors. There’s no better way to soak up the warmth and revel in nature’s beauty than by organizing a delightful summer picnic. Whether you’re planning a cozy gathering with family, a fun day out with friends, or a romantic escape with a loved one, picnics offer the perfect blend of relaxation, good food, and wonderful memories.

I’m grateful to be able to spend my summers in Turkey and enjoy their delicious fruits. My favorites include figs (Teen / تين), pomegranates (Remen, رمان), peaches (Khokh, خوخ), and apricots (Mishmush, مشمش), among many others. You can find a list of fruits & vegetables words in Levantine Arabic in my third book, *Nawartona*. Many of these are also mentioned in my Instagram video, which you can watch at the bottom of the page.

Arabic Script: 

كيف الطقس برا؟ كثير حلو مشمّسة يلا رحنا؟ يلا ليكي شو لقيت لقيت الكعك اللبناني اللي عليه سمسم. كمان رح اخذ معي عصير, وميّ, دراق, وتفاح, وموز. بتحبي الافندي؟ كثير! عظيم هيدا . افندي. كمان رح اخذ كرز, عنب احمر, وعنب اخضر. وليكي هاالتوت بشهّوا. ليه حاسة ناسية شيء؟ اه المخلوطة يلا لضبهم، هيدا الشرشف

Phonatics Script: 

Kif el ta2es bara? Ktir 7ilo w mshemseh. Yala re7na? Yala! Laike shu l2eat, l2eat el-ka3ek el-lebneneh yale 3le simsom. Kamen ra7 ekhud ma3e 3asir, w may, dere2, w tefe7, w moz. Bit7ebe el-afande’? Ktir! 3azim hayda alande’. Kamen ra7 ekhud karaz, 3inab a7mar, w 3inab Akhdar. W lake’ hal-tout bishahu! Le 7ase nesyeh shi? Ah! El-makhlotah! Yala la dobon, hayda sharshaf.

English Translation:

How’s the weather outside? It’s very nice and sunny. Shall we go? Come on, look what I found! I found the Lebanese ka’ak with sesame seeds. I’ll also take juice and water, peaches, apples, and bananas. Do you like tangerines? Great, this tangerine is very good. I’ll also take cherries, red grapes, and green grapes. And look at these delicious-looking berries. Why do I feel like I’m forgetting something? Ah, the mixed nuts! Let’s pack them up. Here’s the tablecloth.

As we wrap up this exploration of Levantine Arabic fruits and vegetables from *Nawartona*, I hope you’ve enjoyed learning about these vibrant and flavorful treasures as much as I do savoring them each summer in Turkey. These fruits and vegetables not only bring a burst of taste and color to our plates but also carry rich cultural significance. Don’t forget to check out the Instagram video at the bottom of the page for more insights and a visual treat of these delicious wonders. Thank you for joining me on this journey, and I look forward to sharing more culinary and cultural delights with you soon!

 

Checkout or textbooks HERE

Join our group classes HERE

Schedule a private class with ME or one of our wonderful teachers!

Join our free Levantine Masterclass HERE

We offer kids classes & kids stories Too! 

Listen to our Levantine Arabic, made easier podcast with scripts available!



Plural Nouns in Arabic are Hard! But These are Easy!

Plural Nouns in Arabic are Hard! But These are Easy!

Thank you for being here 🤍

Notes of Video “Nouns”, make to check the video first at the bottom of this page- Enjoy! 

Arabic plural nouns can be challenging for several reasons:

1. **Broken Plurals**:
– Unlike English, which often forms plurals by adding “s” or “es” to the end of a noun, Arabic has a system of broken plurals. These are formed by changing the internal structure of the word, often involving vowel changes, which can be unpredictable.
– Example:
– “كتاب” (kitāb, book) becomes “كتب” (kutub, books).
– “رجل” (rajul, man) becomes “رجال” (rijāl, men).

2. **Sound Plurals**:
– Arabic also has sound plurals, which are more regular but come in two forms: masculine and feminine. These require different endings.
– Masculine sound plural: “ون” (ūn) or “ين” (īn).
– Example: “معلم” (mu’allim, teacher) becomes “معلمون” (mu’allimūn, teachers).
– Feminine sound plural: “ات” (āt).
– Example: “معلمة” (mu’allima, female teacher) becomes “معلمات” (mu’allimāt, female teachers).

3. **Dual Form**:
– Arabic has a special form for exactly two items, known as the dual form. This is formed by adding “ان” (ān) or “ين” (īn) to the end of the noun, depending on the grammatical case.
– Example: “كتاب” (kitāb, book) becomes “كتابان” (kitābān, two books).

4. **Irregularities**:
– Many nouns have irregular plurals that do not fit into a consistent pattern and must be memorized individually. This irregularity adds to the complexity.

5. **Case Endings**:
– Arabic nouns change their endings based on their case (nominative, accusative, genitive). This can affect how plurals are formed and used in sentences.

6. **Root and Pattern System**:
– Arabic uses a root and pattern system where the root (usually three consonants) conveys the basic meaning, and the pattern (vowels and additional consonants) modifies this meaning. Forming plurals often involves knowing the correct pattern to apply to a given root, which can be difficult for learners.

These factors together make learning and using Arabic plural nouns challenging, requiring significant practice and exposure to become proficient. In Book 3- ‘Nawartona’ we explain plural nouns in depth and in a simple way!

But, did you know we use several nouns in ‘Arabic’ that are actually English words and we add ‘at’ as a suffix.

Check them below:

Arabic (Singular / Plural)

Phonetics (Singular / Plural)

⁠كاميرا / كامرات Camera / Camerat 
لايك / لايكات Like / Liket 
⁠كافيه / كافايات Cafe’ / Cafeyet 
ميساج / مساجات Message / Messaget 
⁠ايميل / ايمايلات Email / Emailet 
⁠تيشرت / تشيرتات Tshirt / Tshirtet 
⁠لونت / لونتتات Lunett / Lunettet 
⁠جاكيت / جاكيتات Jacket / Jacketet
⁠شوز / شوزات Shoes / Shoeset 
⁠موتو / موتويات Moto / Motoyet 
⁠تاكسي / تاكسيات Taxi / Taxiyet 

Now Enjoy the Video!

Checkout or textbooks HERE

Join our group classes HERE

Schedule a private class with ME or one of our wonderful teachers!

Join our free Levantine Masterclass HERE

We offer kids classes & kids stories Too! 

Listen to our Levantine Arabic, made easier podcast with scripts available!





Three “Injuring Verbs” in Levantine Arabic & the Evil Eye :)

Three “Injuring Verbs” in Levantine Arabic & the Evil Eye :)

The belief in the evil eye, or “ayn al-hasud,” is deeply rooted in Middle Eastern culture, spanning across various countries and communities. This ancient superstition holds that a malevolent glare, often fueled by envy or ill-will, can bring misfortune, illness, or even death to the unsuspecting recipient. From everyday mishaps to major life events, many in the Middle East attribute unexplained difficulties to the sinister influence of the evil eye. Protective charms, such as the blue eye amulet or “hamsa” hand, are commonly used to ward off this negative energy. The pervasive belief in the evil eye shapes social interactions and cultural practices, demonstrating the enduring power of superstition in the modern world.

In today’s video, that is available at the bottom of the page. I share a story about how my day went wrong using three useful “injuring verbs” and blaming it all on the “3ein”.

Thank you for being here 🤍

Notes of Video “Verbs”

Phonetic Script:  

7aseh 3laye 3ein el-yom! Ta3o khaberkon shu sar ma3e el-yom: w 3eit el-sobo7 w elet bade eshrab finjen ahweh 3ala rawa2 w makhmekh abel ma yfe2o wlede. B2om bokhbut ku3e bil daraj! Elna meshe! W ana w feyteh 3al matbakh bitfarkash bil sejedeh! Elit la 7ale ya benit rakze shu beke el-yom! Jet e23od w eshrab hal fenjen el-ahweh 3ala rawa2 w shayek el-instagram abel ma yfe2o wlede, b2om bid3as 3ala el-Lego. Serit ayletlon alef marah, “dobo el-al3ab ya wled!”

Arabic script: 

حاسة عليه عين اليوم، تعو خبركم شو صار معي اليوم: وعيت الصبح وقلت بدي انزل اعمل فنجان قهوة على رواق ومخمخ فيه قبل ما يفيقوا ولادي. بقوم بخبط كوعي بالدرج قلنا ماشي! وانا وفايته عالمطبخ بتفركش بالسجادة! قلت لحالي يا بنت ركزي شو بكي اليوم. جيت القعد واشرب هالفنجان القهوة على رواق وشيك الانستغرام قبل ما يفيقوا ولادي, بقوم بدعس على الليغوا. صرت قالتهم الف مرة ,”ضبوا الالعاب يا ولاد”.

English Translation: 

I feel I have an eye on me today!  Let me tell you what happened to me today. I work up early in the morning and I said I want to go down and make a cup of coffee and enjoy it mindfully before my kids wake up. I hit my elbow with the stairs. We said it’s okay! While I’m entering the kitchen, I trip on the carpet. I told myself ‘Girl, focus what is up with you today?”. I came to sit drinking my coffee, checking my instagram before my kids woke up. I step on a Lego! I’ve told them 1 thousand times to pack the toys, kids!”

Root  Imperfect 
Khabat / خبط Ykh-bot / يخبط
Tfakrash / تفركش Yt-far-kash / يتفركش
Da3as / دعس Yd3as / يدعس

In conclusion, the belief in the evil eye remains a significant aspect of Middle Eastern culture, influencing daily life and social interactions. Despite the advances in science and technology, this ancient superstition continues to hold sway, with many attributing their misfortunes and challenges to its malevolent power. Protective rituals and amulets are still widely used, reflecting a deep-seated cultural heritage that blends the mystical with the everyday. The enduring presence of the evil eye in the Middle East highlights the powerful role of tradition and belief in shaping human experiences and perceptions.

Checkout or textbooks HERE

Join our group classes HERE

Schedule a private class with ME or one of our wonderful teachers!

Join our free Levantine Masterclass HERE

We offer kids classes & kids stories Too! 

Listen to our Levantine Arabic, made easier podcast with scripts available!

Homophones and Their Diverse Meanings in Levantine Arabic

Homophones and Their Diverse Meanings in Levantine Arabic

Thank you for being here 🤍

Notes of Video “J” Make sure to watch the video at the bottom of the page! Enjoy! 

In Levantine Arabic, a rich and vibrant dialect spoken across Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Palestine, language learners and native speakers alike encounter an intriguing phenomenon: homophones. These are words that sound identical but carry entirely different meanings. This linguistic characteristic adds a unique layer of complexity and charm to the dialect. For instance, the word “samak” can mean “fish,” while “samakh” means “to forgive.” Similarly, “shajara” refers to a “tree,” but “shajara” with a different context can mean “a problem.” Understanding these nuances is essential for effective communication and offers a fascinating glimpse into the depth and diversity of Levantine Arabic.

 

The Sentence in Arabic The Sentence in Phonetics  The meaning! 
الجمعة بعد الجامع عندي جَمعة بالجامعة El-jum3ah ba3ed el-jem3 3inde jam3ah b jem3ah Friday after the mosque I have a gathering at the university. 

 

Now let’s check the meanings of these 4 different words in Levantine Arabic: 

Words in Arabic Words in Phonetics Meaning Notes (if any)
الجمعة Jum3ah Friday It’s a feminine noun
الجامع Jeme3 Mosque Also ‘masjed’ is interchangeably used. 
جَمعة Jam3ah Gathering It’s a feminine noun
الجامعة Jem3ah  University  It’s a feminine noun

 

The presence of homophones in Levantine Arabic showcases the dialect’s rich complexity and cultural depth. These words, which sound the same but have different meanings, add a layer of intrigue and challenge to both learning and mastering the language. They reflect the dynamic nature of Levantine Arabic and its capacity for nuance and subtlety. Embracing these linguistic quirks not only enhances communication skills but also deepens one’s appreciation for the region’s linguistic heritage. As language learners navigate these homophones, they unlock a deeper understanding of the Levantine Arabic-speaking world and its vibrant cultural tapestry.

Checkout or textbooks HERE

Join our group classes HERE

Schedule a private class with ME or one of our wonderful teachers!

Join our free Levantine Masterclass HERE

We offer kids classes & kids stories Too! 

Listen to our Levantine Arabic, made easier podcast with scripts available!




Top 5 Levantine Arabic Words to Describe a Lame Person

Top 5 Levantine Arabic Words to Describe a Lame Person

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Notes of Video “Lame” Make sure to check the video at the bottom of the page! 

In Levantine Arabic, there are various colorful expressions to describe someone who might be considered “lame” or uninteresting. These words capture a range of nuances, from being boring to lacking charisma. Let’s explore five such words that are commonly used in everyday conversations in the Levantine region.

كمخ، جلق. غليظ، سميك وما بينبلع

Adjective (m/f) #1 غليظ، غليظة
Sentence 

(Arabic)

مش معقول هالبنت شو غليظة
Sentence (Phonetics) Mish ma32ol hal benet shu ghalizah! 
Translation

 

Unbelievable, this girl is so “lame, annoying”

 

Adjective (m/f) #2  سميك، سميكة
Sentence 

(Arabic)

ما تقولي لجون انو نحنا ضاهرين اليوم، ما بدي اياه يجي معنا، كتير سميك هالصبي
Sentence (Phonetics) Ma t2olo la John inu ni7na dahreen elyom, ma bade yeh yeje ma3na. Ktir smik hal sabe’. 
Translation  Don’t tell John we are going out today, I don’t want him to come with us. Very ‘lame, thick’ guy. 

 

Adjective (m/f) #3 كمخ، وكمخة
Sentence 

(Arabic)

فظيعة، شو كمخة هالمخلوقة!
Sentence (Phonetics) Fazi3ah, shu kemkhah hal makhlo2ah! 
Translation  Unbelievable (as ew) really “lame, boring” this creature. 

*Creature here is commonly used in positive situations as well. 

 

Adjective (m/f) #4 جلق، وجلقة
Sentence 

(Arabic)

بدي اعرف شو حابة فيه هالشب كتير جلق! 
Sentence (Phonetics) Bade a3ref shu habeh fi hal shab, ktir jle2!
Translation  I want to know what she loves about this boy, he is very ‘lame, annoying’. 

 

Adjective (m/f) #5 ما بينبلع، ما بتنبلع
Sentence 

(Arabic)

بتحسي جون مهضوم؟ ما بعرف ليش بحسه ما بينبلع
Sentence (Phonetics) Bit7ese John mahdoum? Ma ba3ref lesh b7esu ma byinbala3
Translation  Do you feel John is nice (funny)? I don’t Why I feel ‘he’s indigestible’

 

In conclusion, Levantine Arabic offers a rich tapestry of expressions to describe someone who might be considered lame or uninteresting. Words like ممل (Mammel), باهت (Bahet), تافه (Tafeh), مزعج (Muz’ej), and نشيز (Nasheez) each provide a unique shade of meaning, helping to precisely convey various aspects of a person’s dullness or lack of appeal. Understanding these terms not only enriches your vocabulary but also deepens your appreciation for the nuances of Levantine Arabic culture and communication.